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Known Theaters and Playdates

Taylor Opera House-Trenton, New Jersey

Robert Rosaire & Thomas Elliott-"The Evil Eye"...................................................Trenton Times, 20 Sep 1898

The Memorial-Mansfield, Ohio

Rosaire and Elliott-"The Evil Eye", "asplendid production of the kind, abounding in novel stage and mechanical

effects, as well as numerous good specialties, singing, dancing and acrobatic work...Those clever acrobatic and

pantomime comedians Robert Rosaire and Thomas Elliott, remembered for their trick pugilistic specialty here

several seasons ag, are in the cast and contribute much to the performance."........Mansfield news, 16 Apr 1899

Keith's Theatre-14th Street, between Broadway & 4th Ave, New York City

      Listed as one of 30 Acts--"Best Show in New York".........................................New York Times, 28 Feb 1904

Majestic Theatre-Monroe near State St., Chicago

Rosaire and Doretto as "The Foreign Comedy Acrobats"...........................Chicago Daily Tribune, 27 May 1906

Dominion Theatre-Manitoba, Canada

Rosaire and Doreto in "The Captain and the Sailor"-"just returned from abroad, where for two years their

offering has been a feature in the English music halls."...................Manitoba Morning Free Press, 13 Mar 1909

Colonial Theatre-Broadway & 62nd St, New York City

Rosaire & Doretto on bill with headliner Irene Franklin...........................................New York Times, 7 Nov 1909

Bronx Theatre-149th St & 3rd Ave, New York City

Rosaire & Doretto in Jessie L. Lasky's "Photo-Shop", extra feature-W.C. Fields.......N. Y. Times, 24 Apr 1910

Hanlon's New Superba Theatre-Ashland Ave. & Division St.

Headlining as Rosaire, "King of Clowns" and 60 others................................Chicago Daily Tribune, 25 Sep 1910

Faurot Opera House-Lima, Ohio

Rosaire & Doretto in Hanlon's New "Superba", "Peco, the clown, impersonated by Robert Rosaire, whose

funny antics and adventures give "Superba" much of its popularity, has a score of new escapades and his many

new tricks are said to be more clever than ever before.  An acrobatic specialty by Rosaire and Doreto (sic) is

said to be one of the most wonderful ever presented."............................................Lima Daily News, 23 Mar 1911

The Hippodrome-756 Sixth Ave, New York City

Built in 1905 with a seating capacity of 5,200 people, the Hippodrome was at one time the largest and most successful theater in New York. It featured lavish spectacles complete with circus animals, diving horses, opulent sets, and 500-member choruses. The most popular vaudeville (variety stage) artists of the day, including Harry Houdini, performed at the Hippodrome during its heyday.

This Ad with Robert Rosaire included is from the 19 Aug 1917 New York Times

The Hippodrome-756 Sixth Ave, New York City

Robert Rosaire is listed again as one of the acts at the NYC Hippodrome..............New York Times, 8 Aug 1920

Critic's Review, New York Times, 10 Aug 1920

'GOOD TIMES' REVEALS HIPPODROME AT BEST

Newest Spectacle Offers Memorable Picture in Jeweled Towers, and Good Specialties

GOOD TIMES, an extravaganza in three acts and fifteen scenes, by R.H. Bursalda; music by Raymond Hubbell. At the Hippodrome.

Principals - Belle Story, Arthur Geary Manuelle Flack, Virginia Futrelle, Joseph Parsons, Robert McClellan, Agnes Mack, Miriam Miller, Perry Corwey, Kara & Sek, Max Teuser, the Hannefords, Joe Jackson, Four Roses, Abdullah's Arabe, Platon & Mlle Nataile, Dorothy Gates, Berle Sisters, Helda Strauss, Gladys Comerford, Dorothy Clark, Florence Gast, Violet Brasley, Elizabeth Coyle, Charles Strong, Thomas Colton, Arthur Hill, Pender's Comedians, William Williams, Joseph Frohoff, Albert Froom, the Brothers Berne, Al Harrison, Cissie Hayden, Eddie Russell, Charles Ravel, Thomas Keenan, William Weston, Power's Performing Elephants, Albert Alberts, Harry Ward, Robert Deeno, Michael Morris, Robert Rosaire, William Stanley, George Becker, Timothy O'Connor, Matthew Ettore, Leo Post, George Davis, the Four Nelsons, Marceline

The Hippodrome in the presentation of its sixth annual spectacle since Charles B. Dillingham took over the direction of its destinies adheres in the main to the policies which have made it celebrated. Pre-eminently a home of spectacle, it offers several striking vistas for the eye, the final picture, with jeweled towers flanking the Hippodrome tank, is particularly memorable - but someone has also had the courage this year to pay a good deal of attention to detail. The result is not only a half dozen or more good specialties - with even a little attention to humor now and then - but several gorgeously costumed ensembles which help to make the new show quite one of the best which the Hippodrome has ever offered.

Of the high spots of the new entertainment, nearly all have been part of previous Hippodrome shows one occasion or another. One of the exceptions is a new comer from England named Perry Corwey, a clown with musical leanings, who does not need the red nose and yellow wig of the English halls to make him a success with American audiences. His drolleries earned him the foremost ovation of the evening last night.

The audience also welcomed Edwin Hanneford and Joe Jackson vociferously, and although both adhered rather closely to the turns which have made them familiar, they are entitled to their places near the head of the list. Hanneford and his equestrian family have learned one or two new things about horses since they were here last, and Mr. Jackson now performs his cycling slightly assisted by a messenger boy, but in most respects they are the familiar and welcome comics.

The diving girls also registered strongly with last night's audience - and not entirely because of the temperature without and within. It was either Dorothy Gates or Anna.

Marlow Theatre-Helena Montana

"Robert Rosaire, an animal actor of repute, played cleverly, Dapple, the donkey, a fit comedy figure alongside Sancho Panza.".......Helena Daily Independent, 5 Apr 1925

The Sancho Panza Era